Sounding Natural


Welcome to our next article in the “10 Things to Consider†series on phone manners.

Approved_GreetingThe customary greeting on answering your telephone is something that your business has made a decision on and it is part of the branding of the company.

Each person in the office, whether they normally answer the phone systems’ calls or not, should respond to incoming callers with the same basic format.

The most used reply is: A welcome: This can be Good-Morning, Good-Afternoon or Good-Evening dependant on the time-of-day.

Secondly – clearly state the TITLE of the organisation. This stops any misunderstandings when someone has dialled a wrong number.

Thirdly = give your OWN NAME. It results in the caller getting a nice feeling if they know who they are talking to. For example “Hello, Telephone Systems Direct, JOYCE speaking.â€

You can then ask the customer how you can help them.

By adopting this simple approach it means that you will never be tempted to make an unprofessional remark such as “Hi-ya!†when responding.        

If you regularly use your phone systems in this way – engaging a pleasant tone of voice – then you can immediately create a very positive impression.

It can be an excellent idea to practice this technique on your phone systems so you feel very confident when you pick up the receiver.
Be effective – let your phone systems work for you.  Be aware that your phone systems are assets.  Speak to everyone as if they were the first of the day!

Hopefully you’ll put this tip into effect straight-away.  Pass it on to a colleague or share it via your preferred social media website.

If at any time you would like to chat about phone systems and any associated matters, ring us for free on 0800 652 8052.

Download the complete tutorial here

Smiling


Welcome to our next article in the “10 Things to Consider†series on phone manners.

Approved_GreetingThe customary greeting on answering your telephone is something that your business has made a decision on and it is part of the branding of the company.

Each person in the office, whether they normally answer the phone systems’ calls or not, should respond to incoming callers with the same basic format.

The most used reply is: A welcome: This can be Good-Morning, Good-Afternoon or Good-Evening dependant on the time-of-day.

Secondly – clearly state the TITLE of the organisation. This stops any misunderstandings when someone has dialled a wrong number.

Thirdly = give your OWN NAME. It results in the caller getting a nice feeling if they know who they are talking to. For example “Hello, Telephone Systems Direct, JOYCE speaking.â€

You can then ask the customer how you can help them.

By adopting this simple approach it means that you will never be tempted to make an unprofessional remark such as “Hi-ya!†when responding.        

If you regularly use your phone systems in this way – engaging a pleasant tone of voice – then you can immediately create a very positive impression.

It can be an excellent idea to practice this technique on your phone systems so you feel very confident when you pick up the receiver.
Be effective – let your phone systems work for you.  Be aware that your phone systems are assets.  Speak to everyone as if they were the first of the day!

Hopefully you’ll put this tip into effect straight-away.  Pass it on to a colleague or share it via your preferred social media website.

If at any time you would like to chat about phone systems and any associated matters, ring us for free on 0800 652 8052.

Download the complete tutorial here

Being Polite


Welcome to the “10 Things to Consider†series on Making Calls through phone systems.

Common courtesy costs nothing they say. After all “manners maketh manâ€.

Using correct names on phone systems is also critical. We like to hear our own name said but it must be said correctly. You cannot address an individual as Mike if he introduced himself as Michael.

Being_PoliteBeing polite on the phone includes being considerate. So dispense with any of your colloquialisms and TLAs (that’s Three Letter Acronyms) that may cause confusion. Speak clearly and not too quickly. Do not mumble or rush your introduction. If you are making a service call, take extra effort to appear helpful no matter how much you are, perhaps unexpectedly, being put through the mill by others.     

Also, end your calls without the usual telephone clatter. You can always tell when the handset is banged down on you. There is the noise as the receiver is slammed against its cradle. There is an inference that the calling party is disgruntled, aside from the fact that it is deafening and offensive. Even gently putting a phone down can be quite loud to the caller. So this can be misconstrued to be “slamming†when it is no such thing.

Preferably use an Answer/Release key if you have one on your phone. It makes for a more subtle ending and nobody is offended.  If you don’t have these facilities then press the receiver-button down with your finger before hanging up.

Politeness is free.  Impoliteness loses business for you and the company.

The next article in this course urges you to PUT A SMILE IN YOUR VOICE – we explain why it pays dividends.

If at any point you don’t wish to receive any more of our reminders you can opt out easily by clicking on the appropriate button.  We hope you don’t until you’ve had chance to assimilate all our commentaries on letting phone systems benefit your organisation.

For more explanation or clarification on any of these phone systems topics please contact us on 0800 652 8052.

DOWNLOAD the complete tutorial here

Planning


Welcome to the “10 Things to Consider†series on Making Calls through phone systems.

Common courtesy costs nothing they say. After all “manners maketh manâ€.

Using correct names on phone systems is also critical. We like to hear our own name said but it must be said correctly. You cannot address an individual as Mike if he introduced himself as Michael.

Being_PoliteBeing polite on the phone includes being considerate. So dispense with any of your colloquialisms and TLAs (that’s Three Letter Acronyms) that may cause confusion. Speak clearly and not too quickly. Do not mumble or rush your introduction. If you are making a service call, take extra effort to appear helpful no matter how much you are, perhaps unexpectedly, being put through the mill by others.     

Also, end your calls without the usual telephone clatter. You can always tell when the handset is banged down on you. There is the noise as the receiver is slammed against its cradle. There is an inference that the calling party is disgruntled, aside from the fact that it is deafening and offensive. Even gently putting a phone down can be quite loud to the caller. So this can be misconstrued to be “slamming†when it is no such thing.

Preferably use an Answer/Release key if you have one on your phone. It makes for a more subtle ending and nobody is offended.  If you don’t have these facilities then press the receiver-button down with your finger before hanging up.

Politeness is free.  Impoliteness loses business for you and the company.

The next article in this course urges you to PUT A SMILE IN YOUR VOICE – we explain why it pays dividends.

If at any point you don’t wish to receive any more of our reminders you can opt out easily by clicking on the appropriate button.  We hope you don’t until you’ve had chance to assimilate all our commentaries on letting phone systems benefit your organisation.

For more explanation or clarification on any of these phone systems topics please contact us on 0800 652 8052.

DOWNLOAD the complete tutorial here

Listening


Welcome to the “10 Things to Consider†series on Making Calls through phone systems.

Common courtesy costs nothing they say. After all “manners maketh manâ€.

Using correct names on phone systems is also critical. We like to hear our own name said but it must be said correctly. You cannot address an individual as Mike if he introduced himself as Michael.

Being_PoliteBeing polite on the phone includes being considerate. So dispense with any of your colloquialisms and TLAs (that’s Three Letter Acronyms) that may cause confusion. Speak clearly and not too quickly. Do not mumble or rush your introduction. If you are making a service call, take extra effort to appear helpful no matter how much you are, perhaps unexpectedly, being put through the mill by others.     

Also, end your calls without the usual telephone clatter. You can always tell when the handset is banged down on you. There is the noise as the receiver is slammed against its cradle. There is an inference that the calling party is disgruntled, aside from the fact that it is deafening and offensive. Even gently putting a phone down can be quite loud to the caller. So this can be misconstrued to be “slamming†when it is no such thing.

Preferably use an Answer/Release key if you have one on your phone. It makes for a more subtle ending and nobody is offended.  If you don’t have these facilities then press the receiver-button down with your finger before hanging up.

Politeness is free.  Impoliteness loses business for you and the company.

The next article in this course urges you to PUT A SMILE IN YOUR VOICE – we explain why it pays dividends.

If at any point you don’t wish to receive any more of our reminders you can opt out easily by clicking on the appropriate button.  We hope you don’t until you’ve had chance to assimilate all our commentaries on letting phone systems benefit your organisation.

For more explanation or clarification on any of these phone systems topics please contact us on 0800 652 8052.

DOWNLOAD the complete tutorial here

Letting Clients Talk


Welcome to the “10 Things to Consider†series on Making Calls through phone systems.

Common courtesy costs nothing they say. After all “manners maketh manâ€.

Using correct names on phone systems is also critical. We like to hear our own name said but it must be said correctly. You cannot address an individual as Mike if he introduced himself as Michael.

Being_PoliteBeing polite on the phone includes being considerate. So dispense with any of your colloquialisms and TLAs (that’s Three Letter Acronyms) that may cause confusion. Speak clearly and not too quickly. Do not mumble or rush your introduction. If you are making a service call, take extra effort to appear helpful no matter how much you are, perhaps unexpectedly, being put through the mill by others.     

Also, end your calls without the usual telephone clatter. You can always tell when the handset is banged down on you. There is the noise as the receiver is slammed against its cradle. There is an inference that the calling party is disgruntled, aside from the fact that it is deafening and offensive. Even gently putting a phone down can be quite loud to the caller. So this can be misconstrued to be “slamming†when it is no such thing.

Preferably use an Answer/Release key if you have one on your phone. It makes for a more subtle ending and nobody is offended.  If you don’t have these facilities then press the receiver-button down with your finger before hanging up.

Politeness is free.  Impoliteness loses business for you and the company.

The next article in this course urges you to PUT A SMILE IN YOUR VOICE – we explain why it pays dividends.

If at any point you don’t wish to receive any more of our reminders you can opt out easily by clicking on the appropriate button.  We hope you don’t until you’ve had chance to assimilate all our commentaries on letting phone systems benefit your organisation.

For more explanation or clarification on any of these phone systems topics please contact us on 0800 652 8052.

DOWNLOAD the complete tutorial here

Making Those Calls you Don’t Want to Make


Welcome to the “10 Things to Consider†series on Making Calls through phone systems.

Common courtesy costs nothing they say. After all “manners maketh manâ€.

Using correct names on phone systems is also critical. We like to hear our own name said but it must be said correctly. You cannot address an individual as Mike if he introduced himself as Michael.

Being_PoliteBeing polite on the phone includes being considerate. So dispense with any of your colloquialisms and TLAs (that’s Three Letter Acronyms) that may cause confusion. Speak clearly and not too quickly. Do not mumble or rush your introduction. If you are making a service call, take extra effort to appear helpful no matter how much you are, perhaps unexpectedly, being put through the mill by others.     

Also, end your calls without the usual telephone clatter. You can always tell when the handset is banged down on you. There is the noise as the receiver is slammed against its cradle. There is an inference that the calling party is disgruntled, aside from the fact that it is deafening and offensive. Even gently putting a phone down can be quite loud to the caller. So this can be misconstrued to be “slamming†when it is no such thing.

Preferably use an Answer/Release key if you have one on your phone. It makes for a more subtle ending and nobody is offended.  If you don’t have these facilities then press the receiver-button down with your finger before hanging up.

Politeness is free.  Impoliteness loses business for you and the company.

The next article in this course urges you to PUT A SMILE IN YOUR VOICE – we explain why it pays dividends.

If at any point you don’t wish to receive any more of our reminders you can opt out easily by clicking on the appropriate button.  We hope you don’t until you’ve had chance to assimilate all our commentaries on letting phone systems benefit your organisation.

For more explanation or clarification on any of these phone systems topics please contact us on 0800 652 8052.

DOWNLOAD the complete tutorial here

Having Information to Hand


Welcome to the “10 Things to Consider†series on Making Calls through phone systems.

Common courtesy costs nothing they say. After all “manners maketh manâ€.

Using correct names on phone systems is also critical. We like to hear our own name said but it must be said correctly. You cannot address an individual as Mike if he introduced himself as Michael.

Being_PoliteBeing polite on the phone includes being considerate. So dispense with any of your colloquialisms and TLAs (that’s Three Letter Acronyms) that may cause confusion. Speak clearly and not too quickly. Do not mumble or rush your introduction. If you are making a service call, take extra effort to appear helpful no matter how much you are, perhaps unexpectedly, being put through the mill by others.     

Also, end your calls without the usual telephone clatter. You can always tell when the handset is banged down on you. There is the noise as the receiver is slammed against its cradle. There is an inference that the calling party is disgruntled, aside from the fact that it is deafening and offensive. Even gently putting a phone down can be quite loud to the caller. So this can be misconstrued to be “slamming†when it is no such thing.

Preferably use an Answer/Release key if you have one on your phone. It makes for a more subtle ending and nobody is offended.  If you don’t have these facilities then press the receiver-button down with your finger before hanging up.

Politeness is free.  Impoliteness loses business for you and the company.

The next article in this course urges you to PUT A SMILE IN YOUR VOICE – we explain why it pays dividends.

If at any point you don’t wish to receive any more of our reminders you can opt out easily by clicking on the appropriate button.  We hope you don’t until you’ve had chance to assimilate all our commentaries on letting phone systems benefit your organisation.

For more explanation or clarification on any of these phone systems topics please contact us on 0800 652 8052.

DOWNLOAD the complete tutorial here

Speaking with an Empty Mouth


Welcome to the “10 Things to Consider†series on Making Calls through phone systems.

Common courtesy costs nothing they say. After all “manners maketh manâ€.

Using correct names on phone systems is also critical. We like to hear our own name said but it must be said correctly. You cannot address an individual as Mike if he introduced himself as Michael.

Being_PoliteBeing polite on the phone includes being considerate. So dispense with any of your colloquialisms and TLAs (that’s Three Letter Acronyms) that may cause confusion. Speak clearly and not too quickly. Do not mumble or rush your introduction. If you are making a service call, take extra effort to appear helpful no matter how much you are, perhaps unexpectedly, being put through the mill by others.     

Also, end your calls without the usual telephone clatter. You can always tell when the handset is banged down on you. There is the noise as the receiver is slammed against its cradle. There is an inference that the calling party is disgruntled, aside from the fact that it is deafening and offensive. Even gently putting a phone down can be quite loud to the caller. So this can be misconstrued to be “slamming†when it is no such thing.

Preferably use an Answer/Release key if you have one on your phone. It makes for a more subtle ending and nobody is offended.  If you don’t have these facilities then press the receiver-button down with your finger before hanging up.

Politeness is free.  Impoliteness loses business for you and the company.

The next article in this course urges you to PUT A SMILE IN YOUR VOICE – we explain why it pays dividends.

If at any point you don’t wish to receive any more of our reminders you can opt out easily by clicking on the appropriate button.  We hope you don’t until you’ve had chance to assimilate all our commentaries on letting phone systems benefit your organisation.

For more explanation or clarification on any of these phone systems topics please contact us on 0800 652 8052.

DOWNLOAD the complete tutorial here

Communicating Clearly


Welcome to the “10 Things to Consider†series on Making Calls through phone systems.

Common courtesy costs nothing they say. After all “manners maketh manâ€.

Using correct names on phone systems is also critical. We like to hear our own name said but it must be said correctly. You cannot address an individual as Mike if he introduced himself as Michael.

Being_PoliteBeing polite on the phone includes being considerate. So dispense with any of your colloquialisms and TLAs (that’s Three Letter Acronyms) that may cause confusion. Speak clearly and not too quickly. Do not mumble or rush your introduction. If you are making a service call, take extra effort to appear helpful no matter how much you are, perhaps unexpectedly, being put through the mill by others.     

Also, end your calls without the usual telephone clatter. You can always tell when the handset is banged down on you. There is the noise as the receiver is slammed against its cradle. There is an inference that the calling party is disgruntled, aside from the fact that it is deafening and offensive. Even gently putting a phone down can be quite loud to the caller. So this can be misconstrued to be “slamming†when it is no such thing.

Preferably use an Answer/Release key if you have one on your phone. It makes for a more subtle ending and nobody is offended.  If you don’t have these facilities then press the receiver-button down with your finger before hanging up.

Politeness is free.  Impoliteness loses business for you and the company.

The next article in this course urges you to PUT A SMILE IN YOUR VOICE – we explain why it pays dividends.

If at any point you don’t wish to receive any more of our reminders you can opt out easily by clicking on the appropriate button.  We hope you don’t until you’ve had chance to assimilate all our commentaries on letting phone systems benefit your organisation.

For more explanation or clarification on any of these phone systems topics please contact us on 0800 652 8052.

DOWNLOAD the complete tutorial here