Choosing a Supplier


This is the final piece in our series of “10-things-to-consider-when-picking-phone-lines†for phone systems.

So we’ve considered whether to choose wired or wireless, learned the differences between analogue, ISDN2 and ISDN30; also what the facilities of Caller Line Identity and Direct Dialling Inwards can do for us; how Tariffs & Rentals can be chosen wisely to maximise our benefits while minimising costs; and lately we’ve discussed when you should change to SIP instead of choosing Broadband via Cable or Copper.

Having assimilated all those words we now have to put it all into some semblance of order and make a decision on who can actually provide the service we need into our business phone systems.

There are the obvious choices such as British Telecommunications, Sky and Virgin in the domestic arena, but for firms and companies you may wish to look further afield at the likes of Gamma who sell their offerings through accredited dealerships like us.

What you should consider is the support being offered.  Will your call be answered swiftly in the UK, or after numerous rings abroad?  

If the dealership that supplied your phone systems has the ability to manage your phone-lines for you as well at the right price, then you only have one phone-number to worry about.

Unfortunately for telecoms suppliers today, it is all too easy for customers to switch.  That means they have to perform, or else people do vote with their feet!

We trust you’ve found the entire course on 10 Things to Consider When Picking Phone Lines helpful.

phone_systems_010If you still require any help, then ring us for a chat on 0800 652 8052.

TelephoneSystemsDirect has been in the communications and phone systems supply trade since 1992.  As an integral part of Abbey Telecom Ltd we can boast the accolades of Samsung Platinum Business Partner and holder of the prestigious title of SME Reseller of the Year in 2007.  These are awards not earned easily.

You can be assured of excellence in all our phone systems services and products.

SIP Lines


Welcome to our series of “10-things-to-consider-when-picking-phone-lines for phone systemsâ€.

phone_systems_009Today we will look into the future of the delivery of electronic information through phone systems and into homes for most of the UK.  For some it’s already arrived as these words are written.

We’re going to assess the impact of “Session-Internet-Protocol†– SIP for short on business phone systems.

This protocol was designed to bring the many diverse types of formats, such as Voice-over-IP, Video-on-Demand, Internet Browsing, Video-Conferencing, and others, together so they could be delivered more effectively.

In 2012 most of us will connect to the World Wide Web through analogue phone lines that have a high frequency carrier injected at the local exchange that is decoded on your premises through an internet-router.  All plain ordinary house phones have a filter fitted to remove the high-pitched whistle that we’d hear in our receivers.

S.I.P. is analogous to the LAN in offices.

Currently British Telecom is upgrading its Public Switch Telephone Network to boost the bandwidth that is available to everyone.  Initially cities and large towns were targeted, but it is the intention that by 2016 the vast majority of the United Kingdom will have access to this new technology.

However, until each area has had the implementation for some months and the engineers have become accustomed to resolving the day-to-day problems, you could experience long periods without service.  That’s called being on the “Bleeding Edgeâ€!  Early Adopters must be aware of these potential difficulties.

ISDN2 & ISDN30 plus Broadband will serve countless businesses well for the rest of this decade, but there will be a time to change – especially when there are commercial pressures/advantages.

TelephoneSystemsDirect has a wealth of telephony knowledge.  Formed in 1992 we’ve seen the devastation to trade created by the inadvertent swing of a navies’ digger bucket taking out most of Manchester’s communications!

Ring us for a chat on this, or any other phone systems related topic on 0800 652 8052.

Broadband/Cable


Welcome to our series of “10-things-to-consider-when-picking-phone-lines†for phone systems.

So far we’ve covered the topics of types of phone systems lines, their features, rentals and tariffs.  Now it’s time to look at how things are changing now so you can avoid being left behind, or getting burnt by being an early adopter.

In our next article we’ll be telling you about how SIP is set to transform our communications, but today let us concentrate on Broadband/Cable.

phone_systems_009When you sign up for broadband, your existing analogue line has a high-frequency carrier signal injected on to it in the local exchange.  You need to have a router installed on your premises to decode the signals and feed them into your computer(s).  You phones have to be fitted with filters so that your conversations aren’t degraded by the intrusive background whistle.BroadbandCable_25_OFF

Domestic access to the Internet is taken for granted but the upload-speed and download-speed does vary enormously dependant on your location.  Being in a town or a city centre guarantees you the advertised speeds, but out in the suburbs or in the countryside or on business parks you’ll be lucky, unless cable connections are available, to get anywhere near a quarter of the publicised “X Meg†download speed.

BroadbandCable_PlatCable is more expensive than standard phone systems exchange-lines.  This will usually be fibre-optic and will offer so much bandwidth that you’ll be able to have several people browsing and downloading video simultaneously before anyone notices any degradation in what they’re doing.  Also the routers required are more specialised.

So if you’re in the marketing sector or dealing with high volumes of information then you should explore optical fibre feeds if you can’t wait until S-I-P is offered at your address.

Ring us for a chat on this and other phone systems related matters on 0800 652 8052.

DOWNLOAD the series of articles on 10 Things to Consider when Picking Phone Lines

Rentals


Welcome to our series of “10-things-to-consider-when-picking-phone-lines†for phone systems.

So far we’ve covered the topics of types of phone systems lines, their features, rentals and tariffs.  Now it’s time to look at how things are changing now so you can avoid being left behind, or getting burnt by being an early adopter.

In our next article we’ll be telling you about how SIP is set to transform our communications, but today let us concentrate on Broadband/Cable.

phone_systems_009When you sign up for broadband, your existing analogue line has a high-frequency carrier signal injected on to it in the local exchange.  You need to have a router installed on your premises to decode the signals and feed them into your computer(s).  You phones have to be fitted with filters so that your conversations aren’t degraded by the intrusive background whistle.BroadbandCable_25_OFF

Domestic access to the Internet is taken for granted but the upload-speed and download-speed does vary enormously dependant on your location.  Being in a town or a city centre guarantees you the advertised speeds, but out in the suburbs or in the countryside or on business parks you’ll be lucky, unless cable connections are available, to get anywhere near a quarter of the publicised “X Meg†download speed.

BroadbandCable_PlatCable is more expensive than standard phone systems exchange-lines.  This will usually be fibre-optic and will offer so much bandwidth that you’ll be able to have several people browsing and downloading video simultaneously before anyone notices any degradation in what they’re doing.  Also the routers required are more specialised.

So if you’re in the marketing sector or dealing with high volumes of information then you should explore optical fibre feeds if you can’t wait until S-I-P is offered at your address.

Ring us for a chat on this and other phone systems related matters on 0800 652 8052.

DOWNLOAD the series of articles on 10 Things to Consider when Picking Phone Lines

Tariffs


Welcome to our series of “10-things-to-consider-when-picking-phone-lines†for phone systems.

So far we’ve covered the topics of types of phone systems lines, their features, rentals and tariffs.  Now it’s time to look at how things are changing now so you can avoid being left behind, or getting burnt by being an early adopter.

In our next article we’ll be telling you about how SIP is set to transform our communications, but today let us concentrate on Broadband/Cable.

phone_systems_009When you sign up for broadband, your existing analogue line has a high-frequency carrier signal injected on to it in the local exchange.  You need to have a router installed on your premises to decode the signals and feed them into your computer(s).  You phones have to be fitted with filters so that your conversations aren’t degraded by the intrusive background whistle.BroadbandCable_25_OFF

Domestic access to the Internet is taken for granted but the upload-speed and download-speed does vary enormously dependant on your location.  Being in a town or a city centre guarantees you the advertised speeds, but out in the suburbs or in the countryside or on business parks you’ll be lucky, unless cable connections are available, to get anywhere near a quarter of the publicised “X Meg†download speed.

BroadbandCable_PlatCable is more expensive than standard phone systems exchange-lines.  This will usually be fibre-optic and will offer so much bandwidth that you’ll be able to have several people browsing and downloading video simultaneously before anyone notices any degradation in what they’re doing.  Also the routers required are more specialised.

So if you’re in the marketing sector or dealing with high volumes of information then you should explore optical fibre feeds if you can’t wait until S-I-P is offered at your address.

Ring us for a chat on this and other phone systems related matters on 0800 652 8052.

DOWNLOAD the series of articles on 10 Things to Consider when Picking Phone Lines

CLI & DDI


Welcome to our series of “10-things-to-consider-when-picking-phone-lines†for phone systems.

So far we’ve covered the topics of types of phone systems lines, their features, rentals and tariffs.  Now it’s time to look at how things are changing now so you can avoid being left behind, or getting burnt by being an early adopter.

In our next article we’ll be telling you about how SIP is set to transform our communications, but today let us concentrate on Broadband/Cable.

phone_systems_009When you sign up for broadband, your existing analogue line has a high-frequency carrier signal injected on to it in the local exchange.  You need to have a router installed on your premises to decode the signals and feed them into your computer(s).  You phones have to be fitted with filters so that your conversations aren’t degraded by the intrusive background whistle.BroadbandCable_25_OFF

Domestic access to the Internet is taken for granted but the upload-speed and download-speed does vary enormously dependant on your location.  Being in a town or a city centre guarantees you the advertised speeds, but out in the suburbs or in the countryside or on business parks you’ll be lucky, unless cable connections are available, to get anywhere near a quarter of the publicised “X Meg†download speed.

BroadbandCable_PlatCable is more expensive than standard phone systems exchange-lines.  This will usually be fibre-optic and will offer so much bandwidth that you’ll be able to have several people browsing and downloading video simultaneously before anyone notices any degradation in what they’re doing.  Also the routers required are more specialised.

So if you’re in the marketing sector or dealing with high volumes of information then you should explore optical fibre feeds if you can’t wait until S-I-P is offered at your address.

Ring us for a chat on this and other phone systems related matters on 0800 652 8052.

DOWNLOAD the series of articles on 10 Things to Consider when Picking Phone Lines

ISDN30


Welcome to our series of “10-things-to-consider-when-picking-phone-lines†for phone systems.

So far we’ve covered the topics of types of phone systems lines, their features, rentals and tariffs.  Now it’s time to look at how things are changing now so you can avoid being left behind, or getting burnt by being an early adopter.

In our next article we’ll be telling you about how SIP is set to transform our communications, but today let us concentrate on Broadband/Cable.

phone_systems_009When you sign up for broadband, your existing analogue line has a high-frequency carrier signal injected on to it in the local exchange.  You need to have a router installed on your premises to decode the signals and feed them into your computer(s).  You phones have to be fitted with filters so that your conversations aren’t degraded by the intrusive background whistle.BroadbandCable_25_OFF

Domestic access to the Internet is taken for granted but the upload-speed and download-speed does vary enormously dependant on your location.  Being in a town or a city centre guarantees you the advertised speeds, but out in the suburbs or in the countryside or on business parks you’ll be lucky, unless cable connections are available, to get anywhere near a quarter of the publicised “X Meg†download speed.

BroadbandCable_PlatCable is more expensive than standard phone systems exchange-lines.  This will usually be fibre-optic and will offer so much bandwidth that you’ll be able to have several people browsing and downloading video simultaneously before anyone notices any degradation in what they’re doing.  Also the routers required are more specialised.

So if you’re in the marketing sector or dealing with high volumes of information then you should explore optical fibre feeds if you can’t wait until S-I-P is offered at your address.

Ring us for a chat on this and other phone systems related matters on 0800 652 8052.

DOWNLOAD the series of articles on 10 Things to Consider when Picking Phone Lines

ISDN2


Welcome to our series of “10-things-to-consider-when-picking-phone-lines†for phone systems.

So far we’ve covered the topics of types of phone systems lines, their features, rentals and tariffs.  Now it’s time to look at how things are changing now so you can avoid being left behind, or getting burnt by being an early adopter.

In our next article we’ll be telling you about how SIP is set to transform our communications, but today let us concentrate on Broadband/Cable.

phone_systems_009When you sign up for broadband, your existing analogue line has a high-frequency carrier signal injected on to it in the local exchange.  You need to have a router installed on your premises to decode the signals and feed them into your computer(s).  You phones have to be fitted with filters so that your conversations aren’t degraded by the intrusive background whistle.BroadbandCable_25_OFF

Domestic access to the Internet is taken for granted but the upload-speed and download-speed does vary enormously dependant on your location.  Being in a town or a city centre guarantees you the advertised speeds, but out in the suburbs or in the countryside or on business parks you’ll be lucky, unless cable connections are available, to get anywhere near a quarter of the publicised “X Meg†download speed.

BroadbandCable_PlatCable is more expensive than standard phone systems exchange-lines.  This will usually be fibre-optic and will offer so much bandwidth that you’ll be able to have several people browsing and downloading video simultaneously before anyone notices any degradation in what they’re doing.  Also the routers required are more specialised.

So if you’re in the marketing sector or dealing with high volumes of information then you should explore optical fibre feeds if you can’t wait until S-I-P is offered at your address.

Ring us for a chat on this and other phone systems related matters on 0800 652 8052.

DOWNLOAD the series of articles on 10 Things to Consider when Picking Phone Lines

Analogue


Welcome to the next article in our series of “10-things-to-consider-when-picking-phone-lines for phone systemsâ€.

Today’s topic is about Analogue Phone Lines for your phone systems.

phone_systems_004Analogue technology is what most of us have in our homes.  Think back to the old rotary and then the push-button MF dialling telephones.  It’s over this type of line that we all have our Internet access.  The speed of our connection is determined by the distance we are from the local exchange.  Those living in towns will have a greater download capability than those who live in the countryside. OK there are those who have chosen a cable provider so that they can have far higher digital speeds enabling them to watch TV and movies on demand.

But really what most of us want is to be able to ring friends and family from our house phone or business contacts through our office’s phone systems.

Having analogue-trunks in your offices purely for voice traffic should be a signal that it’s time to change.  They just don’t deliver any information.  ISDN tells you who is calling and why – there’s the Calling Line Identity that your phone systems can recognise and display on the screen of your handset; DDI numbers that give anyone who needs one a personal number so that callers get straight through to them; and the ability to divert calls to other destinations out of normal hours.

Now even those are to be out-dated by SIP trunks.  These will provide high-speed Internet-access for everyone – irrespective of where their home or office is.  You’ll not notice any difference for emails, but when uploading or downloading larger files like high quality photographs or video clips – they’ll be much quicker.

So what are we saying about these style of lines for phone systems?  Well – they aren’t as good as ISDN2 or ISDN30, BUT they will soon be transformed into Session-Internet-Protocol channels – they’ll cost more – but you’ll benefit from the extra, we think.

Ring us for a chat on phone systems – dial 0800 652 8052.

Wired or Wireless


Welcome to the next article in our series of “10-things-to-consider-when-picking-phone-lines for phone systemsâ€.

Today’s topic is about Analogue Phone Lines for your phone systems.

phone_systems_004Analogue technology is what most of us have in our homes.  Think back to the old rotary and then the push-button MF dialling telephones.  It’s over this type of line that we all have our Internet access.  The speed of our connection is determined by the distance we are from the local exchange.  Those living in towns will have a greater download capability than those who live in the countryside. OK there are those who have chosen a cable provider so that they can have far higher digital speeds enabling them to watch TV and movies on demand.

But really what most of us want is to be able to ring friends and family from our house phone or business contacts through our office’s phone systems.

Having analogue-trunks in your offices purely for voice traffic should be a signal that it’s time to change.  They just don’t deliver any information.  ISDN tells you who is calling and why – there’s the Calling Line Identity that your phone systems can recognise and display on the screen of your handset; DDI numbers that give anyone who needs one a personal number so that callers get straight through to them; and the ability to divert calls to other destinations out of normal hours.

Now even those are to be out-dated by SIP trunks.  These will provide high-speed Internet-access for everyone – irrespective of where their home or office is.  You’ll not notice any difference for emails, but when uploading or downloading larger files like high quality photographs or video clips – they’ll be much quicker.

So what are we saying about these style of lines for phone systems?  Well – they aren’t as good as ISDN2 or ISDN30, BUT they will soon be transformed into Session-Internet-Protocol channels – they’ll cost more – but you’ll benefit from the extra, we think.

Ring us for a chat on phone systems – dial 0800 652 8052.